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T C Shelley

From: $350.00

  • Bloomsbury (UK) published author with over 20 years’ teaching experience.
  • T C Shelley is the Author of an epic fantasy trilogy of novels for middle-grade readers. The first in the trilogy is The Monster Who Wasn’t, followed by The Werewolves Who Weren’t.
  • Workshop topics include character and conflict; novel planning; playing with language and emotion; steps to getting published; writing dialogue; teaching creative writing; and, teaching online.
  • The rates in the calendar below apply to ONLINE DELIVERY rates (through Zoom, Microsoft Teams, etc.).
  • Please contact Nudge Productions if you would like to discuss or book T C Shelley.

Bloomsbury (UK) published Author with over 20 years’ teaching experience

T C Shelley school talks and workshops – book or enquire about online, or in person school visits.

Author of the epic fantasy trilogy of novels for middle-grade readers. The first book in the trilogy is The Monster Who Wasn’t. The second, The Werewolves Who Weren’t, was published in late 2020.

Shelley is based in Perth, Western Australia. She is available to deliver her talks and seminars to schools across Australia – either in person, or online.

Who are T C Shelley’s school talks and workshops for? 

T C Shelley has designed a range of specifically targeted school talks and workshops. She has talks and workshops suitable for Year 3 to Year 12 students, teachers (professional development) and parents. 

Each of her talks and workshops is described in more detail below. Shelley also customises her presentations to suit the age and requested focus areas of the school. 

About T C Shelley:

“Shelley is a first-time novelist who writes with the confidence of an old hand. … A treat.

 Emily Bearn, The Daily Telegraph (UK)

T C Shelley has been a writer and a school teacher for nearly thirty years and loves to blend these interests. She has published poems, essays and a novel (and will be publishing more) as she loves language, rhetoric and story.

She also enjoys sharing her ideas and experiences with students and showing them ways to enjoy story more as well as building their own.

“I enjoy writing grand themes… with pixies thrown in.”

Shelley spent ten years of her teaching career as an online English and HASS teacher, as well as building websites for Languages, Science and other disciplines.

Shelley has been writing since she was a child. As an experienced educator she is very comfortable speaking with students.

Her epic fantasy trilogy of novels are for middle-grade readers. The first in the trilogy is The Monster Who Wasn’t. The second, The Werewolves Who Weren’t, was published in late 2020. We excitedly await the title and launch date of the third and final book.

Details about T C Shelley school talks and workshops topics:

PRIMARY SCHOOL WORKSHOPS:

  • Author introduction and Q & A – basic question and answer session with children interested in the characters and story of her books. This generally involves reading a section of the book and engaging with primary aged students and talking to them about myths, themes, how a story starts and why I like writing.

Curriculum links: Year 3 (CELA1476; ACELT1599; ACELT1600; ACELY1676) | Year 4 (ACELT1603; ACELT1604; ACELY1687; ACELT1605)

YEAR 5 TO YEAR 12 WORKSHOPS:

  • Character and conflict – a workshop based on the two elemental conventions of writing. How to build them, their importance in constructing story and how to use them as a foundation for a short story or a novel. We will also look at how they combine and reinforce each other.

Curriculum links: Year 5 (ACELA1501ACELT1612ACELT1795; ACELT1610; ACELT1798) | Year 6 (ACELA1517ACELA1518ACELT1618ACELY1709; ACELT1614) | Year 7 (CELT1625; ACELT1622ACELT1803ACELY1721ACELT1619) | Year 8 (ACELT1626; ACELT1627; ACELT1629; ACELT1632; ACELY1733) | Year 9 (ACELA1550; ACELA1551; ACELA1553; ACELT1637; ACELT1633) | Year 10 (ACELT1641ACELT1812ACELT1642; ACELT1814; ACELT1815).

Year 11 & 12 ATAR English and Literature Learning Outcomes (Character & Conflict):

Year 11 & 12 ATAR English Learning Outcomes:

• understand the relationships between purpose, context and audience and how these relationships influence texts and their meanings
• explaining how texts are created in and for different contexts
• explaining the ways language features, text structures and conventions communicate ideas and perspectives
• the use of techniques associated with imaginative, interpretive and persuasive texts
• using strategies for planning, drafting, editing and proofreading
• analysing the style and structure of texts
• experimenting with text structures, language features and multimodal devices
• critically examining how and why texts position readers and viewers.

Year 11 & 12 ATAR Literature Learning Outcomes:
• the impact of the use of literary conventions and stylistic techniques
• evaluating their own and others’ ideas and readings using logic and evidence
• experimenting with different modes, media and forms
• experimenting with content, form, style, language and medium
• drawing on knowledge and experience of genre, literary devices and the interplay of the visual and verbal in creating new texts
• integrating real and imagined experiences by selecting and adapting particular aspects of texts to create new texts
• using analysis of literary texts to inform imaginative/creative responses

  • Playing with language and emotion – using language to build the way an audience sympathises or empathises with a character. Showing how writers can thoroughly pull an audience into the writing and let readers emotionally respond to a character, rather than intellectually assess them. This is a clear way to learn how to show rather than tell, which is the catch cry of most literary agents.

Curriculum links: Year 5 (ACELA1501; ACELA1502; ACELT1798; ACELY1695; ACELY1692) | Year 6 (ACELA1518; ACELT1617ACELT1800; ACELY1711;ACELY1801) | Year 7 (ACELA1529; ACELT1621; ACELY1721; ACELY1726;ACELT1620) | Year 8 (ACELA1542; ACELA1547; ACELT1627; ACELT1628; ACELT1630; ACELT1768) | Year 9 (ACELA1550; ACELA1551; ACELA1770; ACELA1561) | Year 10 (ACELA1563; ACELA1564; ACELT1643; ACELA1570; ACELT1641; ACELT1814).

Year 11 & 12 ATAR English and Literature Learning Outcomes (Playing with language and emotion):

Year 11 & 12 ATAR English Learning Outcomes:
• using appropriate form, content, style and tone for different purposes and audiences in real and imagined contexts
• analysing how language choices are made for different purposes and in different contexts using appropriate metalanguage
• explaining the ways language features, text structures and conventions communicate ideas and perspectives
• investigating the impact and uses of imaginative, interpretive and persuasive texts
• using accurate spelling, punctuation, syntax and metalanguage.
• questioning responses to texts
• evaluating the effects of rhetorical devices
• the ways ideas, attitudes and voices are represented
• developing and sustaining voice, tone and style
• analysing the values and attitudes expressed in texts
• analysing language, structural and stylistic choices
• analysing the techniques and conventions used in different genres, media and modes
• making innovative and imaginative use of language features
• comparing and evaluating the impact of language features used in a variety of texts and genres

Year 11 & 12 ATAR Literature Learning Outcomes:
how text structures, language features and stylistic elements shape meaning and create particular effects and nuances, including through allusions, paradoxes and ambiguities
the impact of the use of literary conventions and stylistic techniques
transforming texts studied in one medium or genre to another for different audiences and purposes
reflecting on the significance and effects of variations to texts
the ways in which language, structural and stylistic choices communicate values and attitudes and shed new light on familiar ideas
adapting literary conventions for specific audiences, challenging conventions and reinterpreting ideas and perspectives
reflecting on the different ways in which form, personal style, language and content engage and position the audience

YEAR 7 TO YEAR 12 WORKSHOPS:

  • Novel planning – a look at the ‘acts’ of a novel, from the three act breakdown to the Inner Journey planning model. How to create a basic novel idea and establish when and what the significant events should occur and what these look like. The plan will then be turned into a synopsis, which is a great piece of work to assess a student’s understanding of plot development, but can also be a practical tool in acquiring an agent or a publisher.

Curriculum links: Year 7 (ACELT1803; ACELT1622; ACELY1722; ACELY1725; ACELA1763) | Year 8 (ACELT1627; ACELT1629; ACELT1632; ACELY1735; ACELY1810) | Year 9 (ACELA1553ACELT1636ACELT1637; ACELT1772; ACELY1742) | Year 10 (ACELT1641; ACELT1642; ACELT1812; ACELT1814; ACELT1815; ACELY1756).

Year 11 & 12 ATAR English and Literature Learning Outcomes (Novel planning):

Year 11 & 12 ATAR English Learning Outcomes:
explaining how texts are created in and for different contexts
• explaining the ways language features, text structures and conventions communicate ideas and perspectives
• the use of techniques associated with imaginative, interpretive and persuasive texts
• using strategies for planning, drafting, editing and proofreading
• analysing the style and structure of texts
• experimenting with text structures, language features and multimodal devices
• critically examining how and why texts position readers and viewers

Year 11 & 12 ATAR Literature Learning Outcomes:
• the impact of the use of literary conventions and stylistic techniques
• experimenting with different modes, media and forms
• Experimenting with content, form, style, language and medium. Writers may manipulate grammatical and stylistic elements for ideological and/or aesthetic purposes.
• drawing on knowledge and experience of genre, literary devices and the interplay of the visual and verbal in creating new texts

  • Steps to getting published – more of a personal journey through the steps to getting published with practical tips on how to avoid too many pitfalls and minimise rejections. Some guidelines to the editing process and how what materials are needed to approach an agent or publisher. There will be advice that is useful to either self-publish or go the traditional route.

Curriculum links: Year 7 (ACELY1725ACELT1625ACELT1803; ACELY1721ACELA1763) | Year 8 (ACELA1543ACELY1729ACELY1733ACELY1810) | Year 9 (ACELT1772; ACELT1773ACELT1638ACELY1739; ACELY1740) | Year 10 (ACELA1566; ACELT1641ACELT1814; ACELT1815; ACELY1752).

  • Writing dialogue – using linguistic skills, idiom, syntax, rhetoric and other devices to build a character through speech. This works either for script writing as well as traditional prose. Learning how to weave prose based dialogue with narrative or script based dialogue with stage or screen directions will also be addressed. What publishers look for in dialogue.

Curriculum links: Year 7 (ACELA1529; ACELT1805; ACELT1803; ACELY1721; ACELY1722) | Year 8 (ACELA1541; ACELA1542ACELA1550ACELT1627ACELY1733) | Year 9 (ACELA1550ACELA1551; ACELT1633ACELY1740ACELY1811; ACELA1562) | Year 10 (ACELA1563; ACELA1564; ACELT1814; ACELT1815).

Year 11 & 12 ATAR English and Literature Learning Outcomes (Writing dialogue):

Year 11 & 12 ATAR English Learning Outcomes:
• using appropriate form, content, style and tone for different purposes and audiences in real and imagined contexts
• analysing how language choices are made for different purposes and in different contexts using appropriate metalanguage
• explaining the ways language features, text structures and conventions communicate ideas and perspectives
• using accurate spelling, punctuation, syntax and metalanguage.
• evaluating the effects of rhetorical devices
• the ways ideas, attitudes and voices are represented
• developing and sustaining voice, tone and style
• analysing language, structural and stylistic choices
• analysing the techniques and conventions used in different genres, media and modes
• making innovative and imaginative use of language features
• comparing and evaluating the impact of language features used in a variety of texts and genres

Year 11 & 12 ATAR Literature Learning Outcomes:
how text structures, language features and stylistic elements shape meaning and create particular effects and nuances, including through allusions, paradoxes and ambiguities
the impact of the use of literary conventions and stylistic techniques
the ways in which language, structural and stylistic choices communicate values and attitudes and shed new light on familiar ideas
adapting literary conventions for specific audiences, challenging conventions and reinterpreting ideas and perspectives
reflecting on the different ways in which form, personal style, language and content engage and position the audience
how texts in different literary forms, media or traditions are similar or different
reflecting on the ways in which the expectations and values of audiences might shape the created text
adapting medium, form, style, point of view and language
experimenting with elements of style and voice to achieve specific effects
manipulating literary conventions for different audiences and contexts

TEACHER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

  • Teaching creative writing – how to develop good creative pieces in class, looking at the difference in relationship between the essayist/non-fiction writer and the audience, and the creative writer and the audience. Addresses the planning, drafting and editing stages of writing. Reading to write. Tips from the greats.

Australian Professional Standards for Teachers | Professional Knowledge 2.1, 2.5 |Professional Practice 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4

  • Teaching online – professional learning focused on using the medium of the internet. Looking at how a student’s relationship with a teacher changes in the online forum. Establishing practical ways for a department to enter into online teaching, assessing and monitoring students’ progress and well as making the material easy to use and navigate. Helping parents help you.

Australian Professional Standards for Teachers | Professional knowledge 2.1, 2.2, 2.6 | Professional Practice 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, 3.7, 4.1, 4.2, 4.5 | Professional Engagement 6.1, 6.3

Want to book, or find out more?

Please contact Nudge Productions if you would like to discuss or book T C Shelley’s school workshops and talks. You can email greg@nudgeproductions.com.au, or call Greg Cumming on 0406 317 801.

T C Shelley school talk and workshop rates are based on the Australian Society of Authors recommended rates.

About Shelley’s books:

About The Monster Who Wasn’t:

A brilliantly rich and strange fantasy adventure that will make us all believe in monsters – be they good, bad or somewhere in between.

It is a well-known fact that fairies are born from a baby’s first laugh. What is not as well documented is how monsters come into being …

This is the story of a creature who is both strange and unique. When he hatches down in the vast underground lair where monsters dwell, he looks just like a human boy – much to the disgust of everyone watching. Even the grumpy gargoyles who adopt him and nickname him ‘Imp’ only want him to steal chocolate for them from the nearby shops. He’s a child with feet in both worlds, and he doesn’t know where he fits.

But little does Imp realise that Thunderguts, king of the ogres, has a great and dangerous destiny in mind for him, and he’ll stop at nothing to see it come to pass …

About The Werewolves Who Weren’t:

Sam might be half-monster and half-fairy, but since finding a loving family with the Kavanaghs, his daily life has been all human. And now he’s facing one of the greatest human challenges – starting secondary school.

But Sam barely has time to worry about the strange stuff teachers say (why do they call it the Great War when it sounds like was anything but great?) before he is thrust back into the world of monsters. Sam’s school friends Amira, Hazel and Wilfred reveal that they are shifters: noble twin-souled beings who live half their lives as humans and the other half as dogs. When his new friends are kidnapped one by one, Sam is dragged into an adventure that will force him to confront both halves of his own identity, monster and fairy, if he wants a chance at saving their lives …

Reviews of T C Shelley’s books:

The Monster Who Wasn’t reviews:

“Shelley is a first-time novelist who writes with the confidence of an old hand. The plot never flags, but characters have time to develop, and even Shelley’s most outlandish creations are rendered believable by her descriptive precision … A treat.” –  Emily Bearn, The Daily Telegraph (UK)

“This story is quite simply beautifully written and will make us all believe in monsters of all shapes and sizes” – Angels and Urchins

“There are plenty of shocks and frightening moments in store … in this engrossing story” – Primary Times

“The Monster Who Wasn’t is a beautifully written story of family bond and belonging. I don’t remember the last time I loved the characters of a book unanimously.” – Hooked on Bookz

“The Monster Who Wasn’t is a children’s novel of the highest order. It’s an emotionally resonant tale that invokes old folk-tales and is reminiscent of the classics of children’s literature. Lyrically written, and filled with patches of despair and wonder, its range of themes ensure this novel can be enjoyed by both children and adults.” – GeekDad.com

“T C Shelley has created a richly layered world above and below ground, with truly moving characters. The story covers themes of family, loyalty, choice and belonging and it hurtles along at a fast-pace.” – BetterReading.com.au

The Werewolves Who Weren’t reviews:

“Beautifully written with polish and care.The characters are fully imagined, and I look forward to meeting them again in the third book…Suitable for school libraries and classroom teaching, with universal themes to explore such as loyalty, friendship, conformity, diversity, personal ethics/values and the duality of good/evil that exists in human society.” Better Reading

“Exceptional storytelling, diverse characters and a sense of familiarity alongside the new…A gripping story that will continue to evolve as the series goes on.” Ashleigh Meikle, The Book Muse

“Shelley has created a beautiful world where monsters inhabit the human world…The writing is lyrical but accessible and flows quite quickly.” Middle Grade Mavens podcast

“Full of wonderful detail about various types of fanciful monsters…lovely themes of belonging, identity, loyalty and friendship…The ending is hopeful and very intriguing….” ReadPlus

Teachers’ guide to The Monster Who Wasn’t:

 
The publisher’s Teachers’ Guide is available here

Videos about T C Shelley and her books:

Interview with T C Shelley about The Werewolves Who Weren’t from Better Reading:

Interview with TC Shelley about The Warewolves Who Weren't

 

The Monster Who Wasn’t introduction:

The Monster Who Wasn't

Get ready to believe in monsters… ✨ THE MONSTER WHO WASN'T by T.C. Shelley.Available now – http://bit.ly/monsterww

Posted by Bloomsbury Publishing Australia on Thursday, August 15, 2019

 

The Monster Who Wasn’t trailer:

 

The Monster Who Wasn’t creative exercises:

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